About your Search

20130121
20130129
STATION
MSNBCW 6
CSPAN2 4
CNBC 2
MSNBC 2
CNN 1
CNNW 1
CSPAN 1
KGO (ABC) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LANGUAGE
English 33
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
is a collective biography of six african american civil rights lawyers who practice law during the era of segregation. it's about the collective struggles with civil rights and racial identities. it's about the fact that to be an african american civil rights lawyer in this era i argue in the book is to be caught between the black-and-white world. both blacks and whites want things. and identify with these particular lawyers. so to be as kind of a lawyer, thurgood marshall and people like him was to not just be an african-american lawyer. >> how difficult was it for an african american to become a lawyer during this time? >> is not difficult to become a lawyer. you have to go to law school like everybody else. it does cost money. but it is very difficult to succeed as a lawyer because no african-american lawyer is going to have white clients to more very few of them will have white clients. most black people don't have a lot of money. if you have money and you're black you hire a lawyer because, of course, when lawyers will be more effective in a segregated society. very difficult to s
. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did not wear a hat or cold and he died 30 days later but he had floats in the parade. there are 2,100 members
about the struggle for civil rights. >> for if we are truly created equal, the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. >> reporter: as the president made his exit, a pause turning around to take in his final inaugural moment one more time. a microphone picking up what he said. >> reporter: they look like so many american families do when they take in a parade. and we learned the family of the late dr. martin luther king asked the president and the chief justice sign the king family bible after the swearing in. and they did. david muir, abc news, washington. >> incredible moment when he looks back. what a scene that must be. almost a million people out there. >> i would want to take a second look as well. i want to look at you. let me get your better side. all right, okay. >>> so the inaugural observances aren't over, even at this late hour. >> our coverage continues now with abc's brandi hitt live in washington. brandi, after some glitzy galas, there are more events set for later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, rob. good morning, paula. that's right, the
's the critical part of it, right? when they dig in with their civil lawsuit they unearth more stuff as we found out today in the morgan stanley case. why didn't the government dig in? and let me pause at a theory for you and get your reaction to it. one, these guys give a tremendous amount of money to politicians. dick durban said frankly they own the place and he's the second more senior senator for the democrats in the senate. and they're all in the same circle. attorney general eric holder doesn't think waaaa i'm going to do deals that's my friend bob. i just represented him the other day. i'm not going to put bob in jail. >> there are a lot of political appointees. here eric holder and then lanny brewer chief of the criminal division of justice the man who sits at the crux of all this. there are a lot of justice attorneys who would love nothing more than to bring down a major banger, a major wall street player put a notch on their belt. that's a counter veiling to reality. you say without support from above it's hard for them to act and i think that's very likely true. on the other hand i t
state senator henry marsh, a longtime civil rights lawyer, was away attending the president's inauguration. now, that's insulting enough. but it gets worse.
to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. so you say men are superior drivers? yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? [ voice of dennis ] silence. we replaced people with a machine.r, what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. ♪ many hot dogs are within you. try pepto-bismol to-go, it's the power of pepto, but it fits in your pocket. now tell the world daniel... of pepto-bismol to-go. >>> i'm bret baier this washington. the big story here, confirmation hearing for the president's pick as the new secretary of state with foreign policy hot spots around the world. only getting hotter. tonight on "special report,"
. >> andrea: coming up, now a racial component to the bloomberg bomb's soda ban. some civil rights group think it will hurt minority business owners. could it be the straw that break the nanny state back? or the straw that breaks the soda? back in moments. we'll tell you. colleagues with "the five." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> greg: disgusting. >> dana: you're disgusting. >> greg: that is a sick song. >> dana: can i do my segment? we're going to talk about you. soda ban about to go in effect in new york city but has new opposition that used to be for it. they were for it before they were against it. we'll tell you about that in a second. start with this. a new study done by daniel callahan, a senior research fellow at the hastings center. he put out a paper this week. see how skinny he is. he thinks it's maybe time to start shaming people who are overweight, obese, fat. that is the only way to get people to take care of themselves and prevent diss caused by obesity. now greg, do you have any experience you want to share? >> greg: all bioethicists are jerks. they usually talk about euthanasia. this guy
the pick of every darn civilization on the planet. >> right, pick work dogs, not lazy dogs from those donor countries. congressman king said later his remarks were meant as a compliment. charming. so there has been an evolution by the republican party and it's not because rick perry accused anyone of not having a heart. senator mccain, how about some of that famous straight talk? >> i'll give you a little straight talk. look at the last election. look at the last election. we are losing dramatically the hispanic vote, which we think should be ours for a variety of reasons. >> now, losing dramatically. i'm not so sure about that. mitt romney only lost by 44 points among latino voters, a hair's breath really. if republicans think the latino vote should be theirs, they may want to revisit their hardline party platform which reads in part, we oppose any form of amnesty for those who, by intentionally violating the law, disadvantaged those who have obeyed it, granting amnesty only rewards and encourageags more l breaking. there is no indication that the republican base is on board with any of th
to a women's right to vote, of course. selma, alabama, the city where civil rights demonstrators fought for voting rights for african-americans in the march of 1965 only to be met violently by armed state troopers in a day that has since been known as bloody sunday. and the stonewall inn, often thought of the birthplace of the lgbt rights after a gay bar was raided by police in 1969 and for days became the site of protests and riots. here is the president yesterday. >> we, the people, declare today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal, is the star that guides us still just as it guided our forbearers through seneca falls and selma and stonewall, just as it guided all those men and women, sung and unsung, who left footprints along this great mall to hear a preacher say that we cannot walk alone. to hear a king proclaim that our individual freedom is inextricably bound to the freedom of every soul on earth. >> the iconic nature of that speech, we americans love brands. we love iconic moments, whether it's the golden gate bridge or niagara falls or these things
. and then the third element was his expansion of civil rights where he talked about immigrants and gays and even shoehorned gun rights under the rubric of the security. he outlined the liberal agenda, the big-government agenda of the future. >>gretchen: i think there were two words that came out of it that summarized what charles was saying was that the president yesterday used these two words: collective action. if you parse those two words, it could bring you back to how he started in his career as a community organizer. >>steve: bob schieffer from cbs said there were no memorable lines in this speech. i think what is memorable is what his political director at cbs said in offering advice in a "slate" magazine column to the president. go for the throat of the g.o.p. listen. >> this article should scare anybody who has any doubts whatsoever about the media's impartiality. he is the news director, political director -- excuse me -- for cbs news. he writes a piece in which he calls for essentially an antidemocratic action. depoliticize the g.o.p. action. he believes obama at to delegitimize. it
nominated an anti-civil rights candidate in 1964 barry goldwater, and since then has not cracked 20% with the black vote. i'm wondering if just now finally after all these years maybe getting on board with an immigration reform policy do you think that gets you anywhere where you are right now with the latino vote or did that ship sail? >> you know i hope that it does. i'd have to tell you, actions -- i think people are waiting to see what we do. and my hope is that we are going to meet the expectations that people have of us. that this is a problem that we will solve. the american people are interested in solutions. they are just -- they're so tired and as am i of this kicking the can down the road and not having adult conversations if you will about some of these issues whether it's immigration, whether it is the out of control federal spending, whether it is the escalating rate of debt in this country. whether it is the fact that we have a health care system that is going to have to have some attention. and the immigration issue will become linked to the
and -- muskee and stafford and chafee, giants in this body who stepped forward and civil rights, stepped forward on environmental issues, stepped forward on the pressing issues of the time. and so the senate once again in that time period passed laws. i remember i was a kid here in washington, my father was secretary of the interior, the wilderness law, clean water act, clean air act, we set up the environmental protection agency. i mean, these were big laws, big, bold laws that were dealing with our problem. so once again, glory days of the senate. and i -- i -- i think we have that potential as i see the new senators coming in, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too lo
by force. so how dangerous are its threats? and why is the country's largest civil rights organization fighting new york's efforts to crack down on supersized soft drinks? we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." american men and women already are fighting and dying together overseas. the defense secretary leon panetta said today it's time for the military to recognize that reality. so the pentagon has ended its long-time policy of barring women from combat. critics question whether women can handle the grueling, physical tasks that come with those roles. chris lawrence has been looking into this for us. what's the latest, wolf? >> when it comes to integrating women, forget about privacy concerns. sleeping in close quarters, separate bathrooms, never mind that. it's strength and stamina. with a stroke of his pen, defense secretary leon panetta altered the look of the american sword. >> not everyone is going to be able to be a combat soldier but everyone is entitled to a chance. >> panetta officially open
engagement is the essential in protecting our citizens from harm, against civil-rights violations and combating guns, gangss and drugs through violence that steel too many promising futures. you understand exactly what it is that we are up against not only because you hear the alarming statistics in news stories but because you see it firsthand on a daily basis. most importantly you recognize as i do -- all right? most importantly you recognize as i do that no public safety challenge can be understood in isolation and none of us can make the progress we need and secure the result our communities deserve on our own. that is particularly true about gun violence, an issue that in one way or another has touched every city and every count represented here and about which many of you have been passionate advocates. on a number of occasions the leaders in this room have joined with those of us in the justice department who support what enforcement and strengthen anti violence initiatives especially in recent years as our nation has come together in the wake of last month's horse events i
the call to serve throughout his career. his work on issues from education and transportation to civil rights and national service has advanced the causes of our party immeasurably. please join me in thanking our retiring officers. [applause] they have done a remarkable service for the entire country. [applause] >> now, let me introduce our slate of new dnc officers. they are a talented, dedicated and passionate group of people who will strengthen and energize our party. maria elena will serve as vice chair of the dnc. maria's work as executive secretary-treasurer at the los angeles county federation of labor and years of service reaffirm our party's steadfast commitment to american workers. maria will strengthen the already-powerful bond between the dnc and our brothers and sisters in the labor movement. my friend, congresswoman gab earth of hawaii, with your support today will serve as ice varian. a-- vice chair. along with our colleague of illinois is also one of the first female combat veterans to serve in congress. [applause] congresswoman's story is an inspiration and showcases t
creed. >> gretchen: as the rest rand and civil rights leader his words transformed a nation, after nearly 50 years of delivering his most famous speech, what would dr. king think about how we're handling race relations and other issues today. let's ask somebody who would know, alveda king is the niece of dr. martin luther king. and they've written a new book, mar lute king, jr., a king family tribute. what a beautiful book. >> good morning, and thank you so much. all of our family members have contributed to that book, remembering the martin luther king, jr. we knew and loved. and so, it's wonderful that you would even ask what would he be doing today. and he'd be doing the same thing that he was doing then. you know, he spoke with billy graham in madison square garden in his lifetime and he preached the bible and today the bible is front and center again, his bible and president lincoln's bible. so you have 150 years of the emancipation proclamation and 50 years of the dream and they're represented by those two bibles today. >> gretchen: it's so unbelievable it will be the bible f
. it was the only time that they could have a 20-19 vote. >> john: exactly. they did it because of a civil rights veteran in the virginia legislature who went to d.c. anyone in the media address this? even when the republican governor of the state said it was wrong, how were they able to do this on martin luther king day? itit was a holiday. weren't they closed? >> there hasn't been any conversation about how procedurally they were able to get that done. >> john: many think it wasn't legal. it will be challenged in the courts. it might be because virginia doesn't take dr. king's birthday holiday seriously. i don't know if you know this but i spent a lot of time there. my mom's from virginia. i have a lot of family there. >> i'm from virginia. >> you know it's not martin luther king. it is jackson -- they honor two confederate generals and this other fella. >> wow. cognitive dissidence. >> some republicans are backing away from it. >> and legislation hasn't passed on holidays before. there is no law saying you can't pass legislation on holidays. >> john: it is shady. to me, it seems like -- >> it
. outright chaos at worst. outside of the civil war in syria the main concern right now is north africa. libya, algeria where we had the recent hostage taking and deaths of americans. mali where the french are fighting islamist extremists. according to professor burns, this sort of instability could go on for a very long time. >> it may be we don't see the future map of the middle east. it doesn't reveal itself for another 10 or 20 years. this this is so deeply rooted. >> chaos possibly for many years to come. the one thing we know for sure is that terrorists and extremists love chaos. >> that's true. jonathan, thank you. well, online dating doesn't always work out. the woman who says match.com, matched her with a man who stabbed her 10 times and kicked her in the head. mary k. beckman is her name. she is now suing match.com for $10 million. because she says it fails to warn users that online dating can be dangerous. ha! >> mary k. says she met this man wade wiley on match.com in may of 2010. months after she broke up with him he stabbed her 10 times with a butcher knife. repeatedly sto
controls. i mean, that's a deliberate circumvention, right? >> it certainly sounds like it. and it certainly sounds like a good place to start a criminal investigation. >> in fact, according to a civil suit filed by the securities and exchange commission, countrywide's chief executive officer, angelo mozilo, knew as early as 2006 that a significant percentage of its subprime borrowers were engaged in mortgage fraud and that it hid this and other negative information about the quality of its loans from investors. when the case was settled out of court, the s.e.c.'s director of enforcement, robert khuzami, called mozilo "a corporate executive who deliberately disregarded his duty to investors by concealing what he saw from inside the executive suite-- a looming disaster in which countrywide was buckling under the weight of increasing risky mortgage underwriting, mounting defaults and delinquencies, and a deteriorating business model." mozilo, who admitted no wrongdoing, accepted a lifetime ban from ever serving as an officer or director of a publicly traded company, and agree
graduation rates. be right back. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> one of the key things for an exhibition on the civil war are the twin issues of abolition and emancipation. but we are fortunate that they came of age when they did. between the two of them, they make issues around emancipation and abolition, human-rights and american freedom on a general, not raise specific level. -- non-race specific level. if you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half, but you will get is a white cat slinking in one window. there is a letter going up to the bedroom. ladder going up to the bedroom. there is a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evenings of finding a perch and calling to the hand to spend the night with them. -- hen to spend the night with them. if you start adding up although little is an ounce and build the down here at the white girl answering the backyard with the black woman checking to make sure the coast is clear, some viewers have said, she is coming to hear the music. she is
gutted. this is just a shell right here. this should be burning until about noon today. the fire broke out in this 44,000-square foot building at around 2:30 yesterday afternoon. it happened inside a civil engineering squad building, it is a two-story facility. when the fire started, theres with one person working inside this building. he made it out safely. fire officials say had it not been a holiday, there have would have been 200 people inside. one firefighter was treated for minor injuries. officials say this is a very big loss for beale air force base. this is one of the largest. >> two-story building like this housing approximately 200 people. so it sa big loss. but -- so it is a big loss. we'll recover from this and come back stronger. >> reporter: at this point, 200 workers have been displaced by this fire. we're told that a cause is still under investigation. fire investigators won't know until the fire is out that they have to wait until it cools off to go into the building. back to you, tori. >> 7:41 is the time right now. a dozen cars stolen from an east bay dealership. >>
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)